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    bottle jack vs Scissor jack

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    Jeepmedic46

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    bottle jack vs Scissor jack

    Post by Jeepmedic46 on Fri Aug 08, 2014 3:44 am

    I got a flat last night and discovered the jack that came with the truck was broken. Going to be getting a Hi Lift jack eventually. Budget right now dictates either a bottle jack thinking of a six ton or should I go to a junk yard and get a stock scissor jack?
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    MtnClimber
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    Re: bottle jack vs Scissor jack

    Post by MtnClimber on Fri Aug 08, 2014 7:11 am

    Here's my

    I really enjoy my Hi-Lift. So much that I have 2. They works as it should as long as you use & maintain them properly. They'll lift your rig high enough to service it, BUT you'll need a jacking/lifting points and they DO become wobbly as the lift point of the jack gets near the top, even with the Hi-Lift base. They work great for winching stuck Rodeo's and the similar weight vehicles. And unless you have wicked sturdy sliders, the Hi-Lift will be useless in lifting the side of your truck to change a tire.

    In my 4.5" lifted XJ and 3" lifted Tacoma (both of which are rolling on 33's), I use my factory bottle jacks on the Hi-Lift base. The base is used for unstable and/or soft terrain and to gain the extra 3-4" to make contact with the undercarriage. The factory jacks are designed for lifting the vehicle they came in.

    For my 16', 7K lb flat bed trailer, I use a GM 1 ton scissor jack for two reasons. I need the low profile of the jack to get under the trailer, the weight capacity of the jack, and it was only $5 at the junkyard. Ok, 3 reasons...

    For the toss up between a Hi-Lift, scissor jack and a bottle jack on a F150 Supercab, I'd opt for a bottle jack, given there's room to stow it. A bottle jack is much more multi useful as it can be used to aid in bending steering linkages back in shape, more sturdy in the extended position, etc. If you do decide to get a bottle jack, make sure you also get the required handle to use the jack and also retain the rods to lower/raise your spare!

    The Hi-Lift would still be a useful tool as you can use it as a winch or spreader, and they do have hoisting hooks that attach to the lifting pad of the jack and hook to the rim in 2 spots. This will help raise the tire & vehicle to place rocks, logs and such to fill in the hole you found. Hi-Lift also has a attachments that you can use with the handle such as a shovel head, sledge hammer head, and pick-axe head.


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    Jeepmedic46

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    Re: bottle jack vs Scissor jack

    Post by Jeepmedic46 on Fri Aug 08, 2014 10:53 am

    I think I'll go with the 6 ton bottle jack, I do like the hi lift better but funds are short this week.
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    Re: bottle jack vs Scissor jack

    Post by MtnClimber on Fri Aug 08, 2014 2:11 pm

    Spencyg is selling his Hi-Lift and he's in Southern Maine...


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    Re: bottle jack vs Scissor jack

    Post by Jeepmedic46 on Fri Aug 08, 2014 4:34 pm

    Would the 48" hi lift work?
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    MtnClimber
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    Re: bottle jack vs Scissor jack

    Post by MtnClimber on Fri Aug 08, 2014 9:07 pm

    Jeepmedic46 wrote:Would the 48" hi lift work?

    It would for winching and such.


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    booth9c1ss

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    Re: bottle jack vs Scissor jack

    Post by booth9c1ss on Sat Aug 09, 2014 7:15 am

    One of the great things about the hi-lift is also it's limitation.  It has two functions.  It can apply 2.3 tons of spreading force (between the base/ground and the lift hook... this mode for jacking) or 2.3 tons of clamping/squeezing force (between the lift fork and the top of the beam if you have the top piece... This mode is for pulling/winching).  The limitation is that it all needs to happen with 1. a 48" beam in the way (or 60" if you get the big one), and 2. you need about 36" of open space on the other side of the beam to move the long lever that operates the lifting mechanism.

    I have a Hi-lift extreme 48" jack that I rarely use because of the limitations (I do carry it, along with the Hi-lift winch kit in my GMC Sierra).  

    For my purposes, I use a stock bottle jack out of a full-size Chevy/GMC truck.

    • It's not hydraulic, so I don't have to worry about fluid/seals.  
    • It is much smaller than a Hi-lift, about the same size as a hydraulic bottle jack.  
    • It weighs considerably less than the Hi-lift.  
    • I can place it under an axle to lift and change a tire and the vehicle stays pretty stable (A Hi-lift can't lift an axle only, so you end up lifting by the perimeter and keep lifting until the suspension fully droops before the tire comes off the ground, making the entire vehicle higher and less stable).
    • I got mine from a junkyard for $5 (don't forget the crank rods), which make this option cheaper too.  If you bring your tools, GM also made a nice bracket for the jack to go in.
    • The same jack is in 1/2 ton, 3/4 ton, and 1 ton trucks... so it's strong. Hi-lift is rated for 4660 pounds
    • This jack is also a 2 stage jack... as in as you crank from the fully retracted position (let's say 8" for ease of math, I don't remember the exact measurements), the first second extend 6", then the second section extends out of the first for another 6" for a total of 20".  Most hydraulic bottle jacks also do this.

    The Hi-lift jack is a great tool that is very versatile.  It has many uses in the off-road world.  But while it can do a lot of things, it does none of them well.  A hydraulic jack is better for jacking. a winch is better for pulling.  Spencer had one but it didn't have the capacity to lift the incredible Boomer van.

    Choices. Figure out what would work for you and shop accordingly.

    Steve

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